When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part IVPhotos

When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part IV | Photos THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.
Nanjing Night Net

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

TweetFacebookCentral Western Dailyhas scoured it’s archived editions to present to you this look back in time.

Way back in time.

‘When we ruled this city’ galleries have become a staple ofthecentralwesterndaily南京夜网.audiet, with a new one published each Tuesday.

We continue with a look at July, 1993.

Weddings, anniversaries, engagements, 21sts, 18ths and any other event that caught our eye has been included.

This is the last of four chapters which will explore the social goings on in July, 1993.

So sit back and take a walk down memory lane … and try not to choke on your cuppa as you take in the fashions and hairstyles!

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

A view to the past as NAIDOC week starts

Twenty-nine Bendigo organisations received Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags at yesterday’s flag raising ceremony, officially launching NAIDOC week 2014.DJA Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation chairperson Graham Atkinson took the audience 200 years back in time on Monday at this week’s NAIDOC opening ceremony in Bendigo.
Nanjing Night Net

More than 200 people listened as described an untouched landscape of quartz outcrops, grasses covering long gullies and bushes overlooking tree-lined creeks, while elders taught their children to live with their country.

Mr Atkinson’s description of a past Bendigo landscape kicked off NAIDOC week 2014 during the flag ceremony on Monday.

He said the lessons of the past could help guide the future of Bendigo.

“If you looked at how the traditional owners managed and looked after the land, they left it in good shape for when European occupation occurred,” he said.

“That’s why we like to take people on that journey back in time.”

OTHER NEWS:NAIDOC celebrations create buzz: Pictures, video

The flag raising ceremony featured traditional dances and the presentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags to 29 local organisations to demonstrate their involvement in “active reconciliation”.

Mr Atkinson said the number of groups involved increased every year.

“When I did this last year there were between 14 and 20, and now there are 29 recipients this year. That in itself suggests that it is gaining wider interest,” he said.

NAIDOC week, which stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee, is held each July to celebrate Aboriginal culture.

City of Greater Bendigo chief executive officer Craig Niemann said the council had a strong relationship with local Aboriginal communities. “We’re meeting with them often and making sure that what we do is in sync with what they’re trying to do, that we can involve them in as many activities as we possibly can,” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Rousing start to NAIDOC Week: PHOTOS

Rousing start to NAIDOC Week: PHOTOS The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday
Nanjing Night Net

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

The Eurobodalla community kicked off NAIDOC Week on Monday

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Police hunt for knife-wielding bottle shop bandit

Police have released CCTV footage of a man wanted over two armed robberies in Osborne Park and Scarborough in March.
Nanjing Night Net

On Saturday March 8, the man used a knife to rob a bottle shop attatched to a hotel on West Coast Highway at 12.45pm, police spokeswoman Susan Usher said.

Then on Tuesday March 11, the man entered a bottle shop on Main Street in Osborne Park about 9.40pm and robbed the shop again brandishing a knife.

The man is about 20 years old, 175 centimetres tall with tanned skin, a medium build and black hair.

He was wearing a light maroon or orange-hooded jacket during both robberies, blue shorts in the first and black shorts in the second, wearing a small black backpack both times.

Anyone with information should call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000. Follow WAtoday on Twitter

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

A happy new few take their places in Parliament’s red room

Senator David Leyonhjelm on his new job: ”It scares the crap out of me” Photo: Alex Ellinghausen Motoring Enthusiast Senator Ricky Muir with his son at the senators’ swearing-in reception. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen
Nanjing Night Net

Victorian senators, including Liberal Scott Ryan, second from the right, during Monday’s swearing-in ceremony. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Senator Richard Colbeck (left) and Senator David Bushby (right) “drag” the new President of the Senate, Liberal Senator Stephen Parry to the chair. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Judith Ireland blogs live from Parliament Tony Abbott meets his critic PUP senator Jacquie Lambie

There is something oddly reassuring in this world of increasingly uncertain long-term employment prospects to watch a throng of happy souls signing up for a guaranteed six years of solid pay cheques and all the trimmings.

It was such a majestic occasion that David Leyonhjelm, the new libertarian Senator for the previously almost unknown Liberal Democratic Party, declared himself ”scared as crap”.

He was speaking before the ritual swearing-in to the aforementioned years of bench-sitting and decision making, senatorial knees-ups and generous entitlements that lie ahead.

Such an occasion requires the presence of the Governor-General and all the other senators, and Senator Leyonhjelm was concerned he’d forget when to stand up and where to stand, having made such dreadful mistakes, apparently, three times during boot-camp rehearsal last week.

He should not have worried.

He was simply an anonymous new face among a line-up of the blessed, six from each state, plenty of them old hands – why, in this world, almost lifers, having been re-elected for yet another six-year term upon years already served – required to shuffle to the end of the dispatch table and swear or affirm to do their best.

The media benches, usually all but deserted in the Senate, where not much is deemed to happen on a normal day, were crammed. The Press, always clamouring for the shock of the new, were not there, however, to witness the line-up of garden-variety Liberal and Labor senators.

They had come for their first in-the-flesh glimpse of an unusual turn of events in Australian democracy – cross benches stacked with former everyday citizens who had risen to senator status on a tide of public disenchantment with the political class.

There was the Palmer United Party’s Glenn Lazarus, a former rugby league player so physically mastodonic and given to such deep public silence he is known as the brick with eyes, his bulk barely contained by his frontbench desk.

There was fellow PUP, Tasmanian Jacqui Lambie, who imagines herself prime minister one day, shining her light upon all around in a jacket of near-blinding yellow.

And Ricky Muir, the Motoring Enthusiast who, having promised he would buy himself a suit, had done just that but had forgotten to shorten the pants legs, giving him a Chaplinesque look.

Perhaps, like Leyonhjelm, they were all scared as crap. Great decisions and the weight of a shared balance of power have been thrust upon them.

But this was simply their ritual entree to life in the Senate, and they were all cast into the shade by the size of the bible brought to the swearing in by Victorian Liberal Senator Scott Ryan. It was, we learned, a family bible dating back to the 1880s, but its Bunyanesque proportions suggested it might have contained the Dead Sea Scrolls themselves, illustrated and possibly annotated.  When you are from a major party, of not much interest in the new world of the Senate, you have to really try to gain notice.

The senators’ first task was to vote for a new President. Senator Stephen Parry, a Liberal of Tasmania, who brought impeccable credentials to the job, got 63 votes. He was previously a policeman and a funeral director. The Greens’ candidate, Scott Ludlam, got only 10 votes. He was, before politics, a film-maker, artist and graphic designer, and thus altogether too racy to direct the Senate.

And then it was off for morning tea. The first of many.

Follow us on Twitter

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.