GALLERY: Aberdeen Highland Games

CLANS, crowds and contests were the order of the day at the Aberdeen Highland Games last Saturday.
Nanjing Night Net

GALLERY: Aberdeen Highland Games IN SYNCH: The Scone RSL Pipes and Drums band members prepare to enter the grand parade at the Aberdeen Highland Games last Saturday.

READY TO MARCH: Shona McFarland with the Plains Pipes and Drums outfit from Gunnedah.

THE RIGHT NOTE: Tamworth’s pipe band enters the grand parade at Jefferson Park, Aberdeen.

VISITORS: Sydney Thistle joined the Aberdeen Highland Games celebrations at the weekend.

COLOURFUL: The Lithgow Highland Pipe Band made the trek to Aberdeen at the weekend.

MARCHING TO A DIFFERENT DRUM: The Hills District Pipe Band during Saturday’s grand parade.

THE GATHERING: Clan Farqharson Australia strides out at the 15th annual Aberdeen Highland Games.

MUSICAL HIT: The Armidale Pipe Band took part in the massed band salute last Saturday.

METICULOUS: The Royal Australian Navy at the 15th annual Aberdeen Highland Games.

LADY IN BLUE: Mary Hollingworth showed great interest in the grand parade at Jefferson Park.

FOLLOW ME: Drum Major Charles Cooke (second from left) leads the way during the massed band salute.

ALL RISE: A lone piper moved the crowd during the National Anthem at the Aberdeen Highland Games.

IMPRESSIVE: Some of the clans ready themselves for Saturday’s inspection.

AN HONOUR: Chieftain of the Day Greg MacLennan officially opens the 15th annual Aberdeen Highland Games.

RHYTHM’S GOING TO GET YOU: Three-year-old Lucy Turner, from Cobar, found her dancing shoes during the opening ceremony.

FANS YOUNG AND OLD: Matthew Whatman and daughter Layla enjoyed the proceedings on Saturday.

ON FIRE: Australia’s Federation Guard Precision Drill Team certainly captured the crowd’s interest at the weekend.

HIGHLY SKILFUL: Australia’s Federation Guard Precision Drill produced a perfect routine at Jefferson Park.

DIGNITARIES: From left, Upper Hunter Shire mayor Michael Johnsen, Upper Hunter MP George Souris, Aberdeen Highland Games president Barrie Lawn, Hunter MP Joel Fitzgibbon, Chieftain of the Day Greg MacLennan and Woody Udovenko.

PROUD MOMENT: Chieftain of the Day Greg MacLennan with wife Annelle and Woody Udovenko.

DRESSED FOR SUCCESS: Visitors Lillian Baber and Rachel Hattenfels soak up the atmosphere at the Aberdeen Highland Games.

SISTER ACT: Lithgow siblings Rachael and Melissa Besley at Jefferson Park, Aberdeen, last Saturday.

REGAL: Gunnedah’s Heather Welch and John Punch certainly looked the part at the weekend.

TARTAN TERRORS: City of Blacktown Pipe Band members Ewan and Bill Borthwick donned their kilts for the occasion.

ALL POWER: Muswellbrook’s Ben Hoffman (second from right) and his Maitland team mates who contested the Australian National Tug ‘o’ War Titles.

RUNNING FREE: Muswellbrook’s James Davison has his hands full with 15-month-old Clare and Hugh, two-and-a-half.

KING OF THE CLANS: Wallsend’s Luke Edwards strikes a pose at the Aberdeen Highland Games.

FULL OF PRAISE: Mark Lovett, of Moree, was impressed with the weekend activities.

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Rotary Club of Northam elects new officers

Group: RYE, Antoine, Anders and Hannah.THE Rotary Club of Northam has changed officers amid a glorious night of fellowship with some stand out moments.
Nanjing Night Net

District governor Angus Buchanan and wife Grace joined the club as awards were made to several people, recognising Rotarians past and present for their service to Rotary and the community.

The club farewelled Rotary exchange student Antoine Brunin who returned to France on Monday.

Meanwhile the club said hello to repat Anders Vindefelt-Bottke of Denmark (2010-11 Rotary youth exchange) who is back for a month’s holiday, and joined by 2012 outbound exchange, local girl Hannah Bowen.

Stalwart past-president Geoffrey Ruscoe, a member of the club for 36 years, was honoured with a Paul Harris Fellow sapphire, awarded honorary membership and given a plaque recognising his service.

Guests: District governor Angus Buchanana and his wife Grace.

Mr Ruscoe has submitted his resignation due to encroaching age and health issues.

He was then handed a printed memorial in print of the history of the Rotary North West Safari which was initiated by the club, in recognition of his 21 years steering the project, in the initial years with wife Kay.

Out-going: President -elect Jan Horsley and out-going president Velu Ramasamy.

Past club president (2006-7) Julian Krieg was named a Friend of Australian Rotary Health for steering Wheatbelt Men’s Health to where it is at today, from its 2001 start.

Having attained ongoing funding from the state government for four years, Mr Krieg last year retired from the position of chief executive of Wheatbelt Men’s’ Health.

Honour: Geoffrey Ruscoe displaying his sapphire award.

As membership director in 2007-8 he was responsible for introducing three men, in their 40s, one of whom is outgoing president Velu Ramasamy.

His year as president brought much joy and fellowship with ‘dress-up’ nights, a film night, the club celebrating its 60th anniversary of founding; and his dedication to improving the lot of disadvantaged as well as disabled in the community.

He was pinned with a Paul Harris Fellow by district governor Mr Buchanan.

Speech: District governor Angus Buchanan with past presidents Julian Krieg and Brian Webb.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Panthers basketballers victorious

In form: Sydney Kings NBL centre Angus Brandt in action for the Panthers against the Comets. Picture: Courtesy of Noel Rowsell, photoexcellence南京夜网.auTHE Penrith Panthers senior basketball teams had an impressive double-header success over the Sydney City Comets on Saturday night at the Alexandria Basketball Stadium.
Nanjing Night Net

In Round 14 of the 2014 Waratah Championship League (WCL) competition Sydney Flames WNBL stars Rohanee Cox (38 points) and Alicia Poto (26 points) were the catalysts for the eighth-placed Panthers thrilling 87-86 win in the opening game of the night.

That win will lift the Panthers into the top six, with the Bankstown Bruins and Panthers displacing the Newcastle Hunters and Comets respectively, thanks to a combination of results over the weekend.

Penrith then sprang a major surprise on the Comets in the men’s game, suiting up in his first game of the competition, newly-signed Sydney Kings NBL centre Angus Brandt made his mark with a personal haul of 24 points and 10 boards and inspired his lower Blue Mountains team-mate Jarrod Sorenson to a season-best game.

Sorenson finished with 16 points and 13 boards, Sean Albert had 17 points and Ben Kearins 15 points and 8 assists.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Serving Bendigo

Serving Bendigo PROGRESSIVE: John Rophael has an appointment with St John of God Bendigo Hospital. Picture: BRENDAN McCARTHY
Nanjing Night Net

EXCITED: John Rophael.

APPOINTMENT: John Rophael will do work at St John of God Hospital Bendigo.

TweetFacebookTHE Bendigo Advertiser is continuing topublisha series of profiles on healthcare specialists working in Bendigo.

The Central Victorian Medical Recruitment Taskforce worked diligently to create a sustainable medical workforce in central Victoria and the Bendigo Advertiser is helping to spread the word about the expertise available in Bendigo.

JOHN Rophael is a city boy with a passion for the country.

The vascular and endovascular surgeon studied at Melbourne University beforetraining as a junior doctorat St Vincent’s Hospital and rotating through a range of surgical specialties.

Mr Rophael decided to specialise in vascular surgery – medical treatment of diseases of the vascular system or arteries and veins – and split his training between Victoria and New South Wales.

“I trained at The Austin and The Alfred here in Victoria and at the Royal North Shore in Liverpool in Sydney,” he said.

“After I finished my training I decided to work regionally so I set up my practice in Wagga and also in Albury.

“I had quite a big practice there.

“I was essentially the sole surgeon coveringabout 400,000 people in the catchments and surrounding areas.

“It was good for a specialist who’d just finished to go and get that degree of exposure and also offer a regional service.”

Mr Rophael set up Albury’s first endovascular service and was also instrumental in establishing the first regional complex wound and ulcer multidisciplinary service.He also set up the region’s first endovenous laser treatment service.

“In Melbourne vascular surgery is very much city centric whereas in New South Wales I think they’ve tried the model of having vascularsurgeonsin regional areas like Lismore and Byron Bay,” Mr Rophael said.

“They proved it is possible, as long as you have a hospital that has the appropriate facilities.

“Wagga had already had some vascular surgery done there but the vascular surgeon who was there had left for a few years to go and set up in Tasmania.

“But in Albury there was very minimal vascular surgery, in fact no endovascular surgery was being done.So Iset that up and we treated quite a number of patients.”

Mr Rophael provides a range of vasculardiagnosticand interventional services including the management ofperipheral arterial disease; venous disease; complex ulcers and wounds; cerebrovascular disease; aortic and peripheral aneurysms; andspinal access surgery.

“Traditionally vascular surgery was done as open surgery,” Mr Rophael said.

“Now about 60 per cent of vascular surgery workload is endovascular which is minimally invasive, done through the vessel rather than exposing thevessels.So if you have a blocked artery, traditionally you’d open the artery and clear it out with open surgery.Now you put a little wire and you balloon it.

“Our patient population is often patients who are in their 70s and 80s and so on for whom a minimally invasive approach is always better because it carries a lesser risk ofanestheticcomplications, wound infection andthat sort of thing.”

Mr Rophael is based in Melbourne but has an appointment at St John of God Bendigo Hospital.

“I like workingregionally,” he said.

“The message I would like to convey is it is possible to do complex surgery for vascular surgery in a regional centre and I’m offering that here in Bendigo.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part IIIPhotos

When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part III | Photos THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.
Nanjing Night Net

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

TweetFacebookCentral Western Dailyhas scoured it’s archived editions to present to you this look back in time.

Way back in time.

‘When we ruled this city’ galleries have become a staple ofthecentralwesterndaily南京夜网.audiet, with a new one published each Tuesday.

We continue with a look at July, 1993.

Weddings, anniversaries, engagements, 21sts, 18ths and any other event that caught our eye has been included.

This is the third of four chapters which will explore the social goings on in July, 1993.

So sit back and take a walk down memory lane … and try not to choke on your cuppa as you take in the fashions and hairstyles!

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.