When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part IIPhotos

When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part II | Photos THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.
Nanjing Night Net

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

TweetFacebookCentral Western Dailyhas scoured it’s archived editions to present to you this look back in time.

Way back in time.

‘When we ruled this city’ galleries have become a staple ofthecentralwesterndaily南京夜网.audiet, with a new one published each Tuesday.

We continue with a look at July, 1993.

Weddings, anniversaries, engagements, 21sts, 18ths and any other event that caught our eye has been included.

This is the second of four chapter which will explore the social goings on in July, 1993.

So sit back and take a walk down memory lane … and try not to choke on your cuppa as you take in the fashions and hairstyles!

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Second big scalp for Halls Head in Peel Football League

Second big scalp for Halls Head in Peel Football League Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.
Nanjing Night Net

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

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Calls to help sex-change kids as demand for gender reassignment soars

An increasing number of children identifying as transgender. The number ofchildren accessing medical treatment to help them change gender has increased 60-fold, leaving Australia’s only clinic for transgender young people struggling to cope with the rise in demand.
Nanjing Night Net

Exclusive figures obtained byThe Sunday Ageshow the Royal Children’s Hospital gender dysphoria service is seeing 150 patients a year, with new referrals rising from one per year in 2003 to 60 in 2014.

Gender pioneers wage war with law and officialdom

Parents of children as young as three with gender dysphoria – which causes persistent and distressing feelings of being born the wrong sex – are facing a five-month wait for treatment.

Doctors say the surge in demand is being seen throughout the Western world as increased awareness of transgender issues prompts more people to seek help to transition to the gender with which they identify.

But doctors fear services are not keeping up, and warn that delayed treatment puts patients at high risk of self-harm.

“For young people who aren’t supported in expressing and having treatment for their gender dysphoria, approximately 30 per cent will attempt suicide and the evidence is that they are at greatest risk in the time between deciding they want to pursue treatment and actually being able to access that treatment,” said Michelle Telfer, clinical leader at the Royal Children’s Hospital’s Centre for Adolescent Health, and head of the gender dysphoria service.

While gender non-conformity in itself is not a mental disorder, for those who experience distress around gender identity, treatment is critical.

“We see kids in early primary school who might be biologically female but have never worn a dress to school and have always worn typically male clothing and have been known as a boy throughout their schooling so to suddenly go through puberty and develop breasts, it’s an emergency for that person to receive treatment.”

Dr Telfer said further barriers are arising due to a “cruel and unnecessary” legal process that is forcing desperate parents to spend $20,000 or more in court costs to access medical intervention.

While the hospital can provide puberty-suppressing drugs without a court order – usually from the age of 11 onwards providing there is parental consent – Australia is one of the few jurisdictions in the world that requires court approval for stage two hormone treatment to help patients develop the characteristics of their affirmed gender. Long-term use of puberty-blockers can cause osteoporosis, meaning patients usually stop taking them at 16. But without access to hormone therapy they will revert back to their birth gender, causing significant distress.

The Family Court relies solely on the evidence of the hospital’s medical team yet still forces parents to go to court for hormone approval, which has been granted in 100 per cent of cases.

Melbourne mother-of-three Therese* toldThe Sunday Ageshe spent her life savings on legal fees to help 17-year-old son Sam, who was born female, gain access to hormones after he was diagnosed with gender dysphoria.

“He was a really unhappy child. He was angry, and he couldn’t deal with the changes happening to his body. I’m a single mum and I’m in debt now but I just don’t want to think about what would have happened if I didn’t do it. It’s important that he feels comfortable in the body he’s in so it’s really unfair that you have to go through the legal system to make that happen.’’

Sam*, who said he has felt like a boy since he was a young child, started hormone injections last month and said it was a relief to finally get the treatment.

“If I wasn’t certain I would have waited until I was 18 when I wouldn’t need a court order, but I was so certain this was the right thing to do. It’s distressing to see your peers grow to six feet and start getting facial hair and basically growing up and you’re not, and you’re in a body you’re really not comfortable with.”

In a landmark case in August last year, the Family Court ruled that legal intervention was no longer required for puberty-suppressing drugs after the parents of “Jamie” challenged the need for court permission for their son, who was born female, to receive treatment.

The ruling stated that the therapy was reversible and, provided there was parental consent and approval from the child’s medical team, court authority was not required. However, it ruled stage two treatment, which is only partially reversible, still required a court order.

Dr Telfer said the situation was absurd. “With really young children who show gender-identity concerns, approximately only 20 per cent will persist with those concerns into puberty – that’s why we don’t start medical intervention until the child is older. Once you hit puberty, if you identify as being transgender then 99.5 per cent of those people will continue to feel that way throughout adulthood,” she said. “The time that doctors are required to produce evidence for the court with the growing number of patients means we are going to need a huge amount of resources to keep up with demand.”

The hospital is lobbying the state government to increase funding for the clinic and change legislation that requires court orders for hormone treatment, andThe Sunday Agebelieves a ministerial advisory group on transgender issues has recommended both measures.

Story courtesy ofhttp://www.smh南京夜网.au/national/calls-to-help-sexchange-kids-as-demand-for-gender-reassignment-soars-20140704-zsvz7.html

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Bogan mobile childcare service boosted by $130,000 federal grant

Parkes MP Mark Coulton. File photo.
Nanjing Night Net

A mobile childcare service that supports 13 isolated communities from its Nyngan base has received $130,000 in federal funding.

The boost for the Bogan Bush Mobile Resource Unit is part of more than $2 million to flow into the Parkes electorate from a program supporting providers in regional, remote, rural, disadvantaged and indigenous areas.

Parkes MP Mark Coulton recently announced the Budget Based Funded Programme grants to a total of seven mobile services, which received his praise for their support of communities with no viable permanent option.

Mr Coulton said the funding grants were designed to help mobile services with the cost of upgrading their vehicle, training staff and buying new educational equipment including books, DVDs, toys and other resources.

The Bogan Bush Mobile Resource Unit, which received the maximum grant of $130,000, assists the communities of Marthaguy, Quambone, Nyngan, Trangie, Mullengudgery, Collie, Tottenham, Collerina, the Marra, Hermidale, Girilambone, Warren and Mungery.

The Lachlan Mobile Child Care Service and the Paroo Contact Children’s Mobile also received the maximum grant.

Bourke and District Children’s Service, Brewarrina Mobile Resource Van, Goonimoo Mobile Resource Van and Tharawonga Mobile Resource Unit received $30,000 each.

“The Abbott government is committed to ensuring Australian families have access to affordable, flexible, high-qualitychildcareno matter where they live,”Mr Coultonsaid.

“Thesemobileservicesdo a fantastic job supporting regional and remote communities where access to permanentchildcareservices, let alone places, is not always available.

“They provide the Parkes electorate with a broad range ofservicessuch as playgroups, vacationcare, on-farmcare, parenting support and toy and DVD-lending libraries.

“Having a reliable and safe vehicle will allow theseservicesto focus their time, money and energy on high-quality education andcare.

“This funding will also helpserviceswith the cost of training their staff to deal with the unique challenges that come with delivering high-qualitychildcareon the road.”

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Caravan park fire, Neighbour suspects arson: VIDEO

NEIGHBOURS believe arson was responsible for the fire which destroyed two homes at a West Haven caravan park on Saturday night.
Nanjing Night Net

The residences, at the south east corner of the Christmas Cove Caravan and Lifestyle Park, started to burn about 6.03pm.

VIDEO FOOTAGE: A neighbour’s eyewitness account (click on the link below)

Neighbour’s eyewitness accountPHOTO GALLERY

WHEN THE STORY BROKE

Neighbour Ron Thatcher heard a loud smash followed by an explosion, and immediately went to investigate.

The army veteran said almost immediately the caravan closest to Ocean Drive was engulfed in flames.

“My hunch is that it was two Molotov cocktails, merely by the boom followed by an oomph noise as it exploded,” Mr Thatcher said.

What a mess: Firefighters mop up at the scene on Saturday night. Pic: MATT McLENNAN

The first van to burn was empty as its residents left the previous day at the request of management.

“There was no one living there, and nothing in there that could burn like gas or a stove or oil, so it must have been a deliberate act,” Mr Thatcher said.

“Some of the guys standing out there in the cold with me last night mentioned that was their theory too, and that was before I’d said a word about it.

“We’re all of a similar mind on that.”

The woman living in the second caravan heard the noise, saw flames outside and fled just in time.

Most of the caravan park’s residents were evacuated by police from 6.15pm, while the complex’s power supply was shut down.

The area outside the management’s office was filled with people of all ages until about 9pm when they were permitted to return to their homes.

“There were lots of small kids,” Mr Thatcher said.

“There’s a couple whose grandchildren were running around with their blankets pretending to be Batman, oblivious to everything.

“They were having fun, but the rest of us were freezing.

“One guy came wearing thongs and shorts. He was suffering by the end of the night.”

Mr Thatcher grabbed a nearby fire hose to protect the home of his 86-year-old neighbour – a man who buried his wife on Friday – which flanked the side of the fire.

“I just knew that he couldn’t lose his house too,” Mr Thatcher.

“One of the gas bottles further up started to go and it sounded like a jumbo jet.

“I thought it was going to blow up like a hand grenade.”

The Laurieton Fire Brigade, led by Captain Les King, arrived shortly after and secured the area.

Detectives and forensic specialists established a crime scene on Saturday night.

Police were unable to comment on the suspected arson, and said the investigation is continuing.

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