Nashos long to list locals

The call has gone out for locals who enlisted for National Service between 1950 and 1959 in and around Griffith to add their names to a list. Thecall has gone out for locals who enlisted for National Service between 1950 and 1959 in and around Griffith to add their names to a list.
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Griffith National Service branch member Jim McGann said the project, started by the late Vic Budd, hoped to create a historical record to be kept at the Griffith War Memorial Museum.

The current list of names, which contains about 250, is at the Griffith City Library and locals are being invited to check its accuracy and add their names to it.

“This is something we want to do inVic’s memory. Registration for National Service started mid-November 1950 until the end of December 1959,” Mr McGann said.

“I was one of the ones who went to afortnightly camp in about 1953 because the Korean war was about to finish.

“In that period of time, up to 1959, we were put on the short list to go to conflict in Malaya.

“It subsided and they didn’t need us.”

Mr McGann said he wanted to complete the list, but had found it difficult due to privacy laws.

“We are putting together this list and don’t want to miss anyone,” he said.

“Our intention is to give the list to the museum.

“This is about making sure all of our history is recorded.

“When I went to find out who was on the register in Griffith I was refused because of the privacy laws.

“It means everyone has to come to us.”

The list can be found at the front counter of the library and anyone with any relevant details is urged to contribute.

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Young gunns at heart volunteer

Bob and Lorraine Gunn moved to the Axedale region 50 years ago and have loved it ever since.
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They helped build the community from the bottom up.

The couple made themoveto begin the regions first caravan park on the banks of Lake Eppalock.

Mrs Gunn said she volunteered in many areas of her community.

She said she struggled to remember each of them.

Mrs Gunn writes for thenews publication, Axedale Antics.

She said she contributed articles to each edition.

“We also publish a brief history of the Axedale region,” she said.

“We do a list of current events and activities in the area, as well.”

Mrs Gunn said she was also involved in the local Country Womens Association.

Mr Gunn said he was also involved in the development of the community area.

“We were both founding members of the Axedale golf club and Bob helped design the course,” Mrs Gunn said.

Mr Gunn received the citizen of the year award two years ago.

He was also a fire captain for 16 years in Mosquito Creek.

Mrs Gunn said volunteering was just part of their “everyday life”.

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‘Pinup’ contest brings back happy days

Self-growth: Nathan Robinson: “This is the first year the competition has had a brother and sister duo,” he said. Picture: Gary Warrick
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SHALVEY resident Nathan Robinson said his self-esteem and confidence was at the lowest it had ever been.

He was going through a divorce; he had lost his home; and he had recently moved back home to Canberra from Western Australia.

Then he entered the Mr Pinup category in the Miss Pinup Australia competition.

The competition focuses on the return of old-fashioned values and vintage fashion — and life started to look promising again for the 28-year-old.

“I’m on top of the world,” he said.

“I met my new girlfriend Miss Wurple Violet through the competition, and then I relocated to Shalvey to be with her and her three kids. It’s been a whirlwind of positives.”

Robinson, who goes by the pin-up name Harley Quinn, won the Mr Pinup NSW category at the state finals on June 29 at Blacktown Workers Club.

The contestant, who draws inspiration from the TV show Happy Days, said the competition was more than a beauty pageant — it was a journey of self-growth.

“We haven’t seen it as a competition and I have made some really good friends,” he said.

“I have been growing personally throughout the whole experience.

“Now wearing vintage — I wear a lot more colour and I have even come out of my shell.”

Robinson said he and his fellow male competitor, Gentleman Jack De Wilde, have become “real good” friends.

“It’s not about beating him,” he said.

“It’s about supporting each other which we have done by talking, bouncing ideas of each other and overall encouraging each other.”

Robinson will see his sister, Miss Annie Key, who is also competing in the national competition on August 2, at Hornsby RSL.

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VOTE HERE: Wean Races Hot 50 Fashions

VOTE HERE: Wean Races Hot 50 Fashions 1. Gemma Yarnold.
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2. Katie Wicks.

3. Kristine Ainsworth.

4. Emma Bohringer.

5. Rose Dunstone.

6. Justine Taylor.

7. Patricia Whitby.

8. Libby Gruszynski.

9. MK.

10. Alissa Dart.

11. Ellen Webster.

12. Rowan McClung.

13. John Chalmers.

14. Elisha Kelly.

15. Glen Baker.

16. Alisha Reading.

17. Iain Hilliard.

18. Elise Hilliard.

19. Bernadette Horneman.

20. Julie Gillham.

21. Jo Gillham.

22. Hannah Smith.

23. Louella Sutherland.

24. Andrew Swain.

25. Diane Moore.

26. Amanda Teese.

27. Linda Robinson.

28. Brianna Learmonth.

29. Emily Learmonth.

30. Paige Donnelly.

31. Rebecca Swain.

32. Trish Smith.

33. Rachel Harry.

34. Anda Leigh Reilly.

35. Nick Waddell.

36. Nicole Hubbard.

37. Corrina Loricchiella.

38. Pip Henry.

39. Maddy Lang.

40. Jim Shepherd.

41. Luke Welsh.

42. Eliza Parrott.

43. Brian Goldrich.

44. Katie Gorringe.

45. Ray Weinert.

46. Ashley Burgess.

47. Kayla Newton.

48. Barbara Swain.

49. Margaret Carlton.

50. Christopher Atkinson.

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TAKING AIM

READY TO FIRE: Geoff Grenfell gets help packing from his daughter Aleisha, 10, ahead of the Commonwealth Games. Picture: JIM ALDERSEYSHARP shooter Geoff Grenfell has Commonwealth Games gold in his sights.
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The Bendigo man will fly out to Glasgow later this week to prepare for his third Commonwealth Games.

Grenfell has been in some hot form over the past six months but says it has been a gruelling journey to qualify for Australia.

He said it was important for him to continue to fire in the lead up to shooting’s pinnacle event.

“I went to the national titles two weeks ago and came away with a big win, that was back-to-back wins at the national titles,” Grenfell said.

“All of Australia’s top shooters were there and it gave me some confidence.

“It was great to know that I am at my peak and that I am performing well.”

The 53-year-old said over the past two weeks he has tried not to get overwhelmed by the big stage that is the Commonwealth Games.

“The last few weeks leading up to go away I try and not get to emotional or too involved about going over to the games because you can burn yourself out,” Grenfell said.

“I have taken steps this time to be prepared to not get too wrapped up in the hype over there.

“I am going over there early which will give me the opportunity to go on the range and do some private training and relax into the environment.”

Grenfell will be competing in the full-bore rifle shooting individual event and will then team-up with Benalla’s James Corbett in the pairs event.

“I have five days of competition, so mentally I have to be prepared,” he said.

“I have to be careful to not over do my training.”

It is 20 years on since Grenfell won a gold medal at the 1994 Games in Canada.

Grenfell is a Bendigo Advertiser Sports Star of the Year winner and member of the Hall of Fame.

Sports Star is now in its 50th year and is backed by Prime 7 and Benidgo Bank.

Grenfell will fly out to Glasgow on Thursday with the Commonwealth Games officially beginning on July 24.

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Fire safety a hot topic

BURNING INTEREST: Rachel Priest, 9, Griffith City Library’s Michael Lee and Gemma Zarins, 11, read up on fire safety on Friday during the NSW Rural Fire Services story time. THINGS really heated up at the library on Friday when members of the NSW Rural Fire Service dropped by to share some safety tips.
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The fire safety talk washeld as part of the usualstory time, with about 50children and their parents hearing from NSW RuralFire Service MIA district technical officer Michael Borgand community engagement member Lynn Woodham.

Mr Borg told the crowd about fire safety and gave advice about what to do in the event of a fire.

“The Rural Fire Service is made up of volunteers and we are not just about protecting our own communities but communities all over,” Mr Borg said.

“Volunteers come from all walks of life.

“If you see a fire you need to dial 000 to report it and give your name and the location of the fire.”

He also spoke about the importance of preparing homes by cleaning gutters and removing trees.

Following the fire safety talk the library’s Michael Lee conducted a crowd sourced story time, where he illustrated as he went.

“We worked in the firesafety theme and reiterated the lessons they learnt earlier.”

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GALLERY: When we ruled this city, July, 1996 – Part III

GALLERY: When we ruled this city, July, 1996 – Part III THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.
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THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1996.

TweetFacebookCentral Western Dailyhas scoured it’s archived editions to present to you this look back in time.

Way back in time.

‘When we ruled this city’ galleries have become a staple ofthecentralwesterndaily南京夜网.audiet, with a new one published each Tuesday.

We continue with a look at July, 1996.

Weddings, anniversaries, engagements, 21sts, 18ths and any other event that caught our eye has been included.

This is the third of five chapters – published throughout this month – which will explore the social goings on in July, 1996.

So sit back and take a walk down memory lane … and try not to choke on your cuppa as you take in the fashions and hairstyles!

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$1.6 million to restore historic house

History in the making: Mount Druitt Historical Society treasurer Sue Fitzgerald and president Hazel Magann have welcomed the proposed restoration of Woodstock House. “It’s a significant old house,” Mrs Magann said. Picture: Helen NezdropaONE of Plumpton’s oldest and best kept secrets is set to be restored to its former glory.
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A Blacktown Council report has recommended the $1.6 million restoration of Woodstock House, built in 1875.

The wooden house was built by Walter Lam, who managed Woodstock Fruit Cannery and Processing Works and lived there until his death in 1906.

The area was initially known as Woodstock, but when a post office was established in 1889, there was confusion as a railway station on the Blayney-Harden railway line was also called Woodstock.

It became a boarding house in 1937, which ran for more than 50 years until Blacktown Council bought it in 1998 to use as a community facility, which never eventuated.

It’s one of the favourite homes of Mount Druitt Historical Society president Hazel Magann.

“It’s the reason why I got involved in the historical society,” she said.

“There’s something about the house that draws you. We would like to see it fully restored to its former glory. But we hope the successful tender is much aware of the property’s history and respects the building. It was the private home of Mr Lam, who had a big impact on the area. He put a lot into the property and into Plumpton.”

The council report says the building is now in a dilapidated state.

Tenders were called to undertake restoration works but the council resolved to defer the matter in 2012 following advice about the market value of the site.

“It was to be fully restored as a childcare development but that fell through and [it] has stood vacant and deteriorated since,” Mrs Magann said.

“We patrol it regularly but it’s currently in a bad way.”

Council officers have considered various options and recommended to restore Woodstock.

The council report recommends seeking listing on the State Heritage Register to ensure the house is protected into the future.

A new expression of interest to lease the property will be undertaken when the restoration is complete. The rezoning of an adjoining reserve is also recommended.

“The house is unique to the Plumpton area as it was the first wooden home of its type to be built there,” Mrs Magann said.

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Council defends removal of trees

THE Land and Housing Corporation has Blacktown Council’s approval to chop 89 trees in the Marquesa Crescent housing development in Mount Druitt, but resident Daniel Taylor (pictured) says it’s “disappointing”.
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On June 24 Mr Taylor, a member of the Western Sydney Conservation Alliance, protested to stop what he calls the council’s “war on trees”.

“Council is chopping trees all over the place and I need to try to save their lives,” he said.

“These are perfectly healthy trees that are an incredible bird habitat.”

But a council spokeswoman said it had “strong policies to ensure that the city’s flora remains a prominent and important feature”.

The Land and Housing Corporation applied for the removal of 133 trees at the location, of which council approved 89 and rejected 44 after consulting an independent arborist.

“A condition of the tree application is that for every tree removed, it is replaced with two native trees,” the spokeswoman said.

“Council will ensure that all replacement trees are planted.”

Mr Taylor initiated a one-man protest against the removal of the trees but said he was representing the residents in the housing community.

“All the residents I’ve spoken to said they don’t want the trees removed,” he said.

“We live in a powerless community out here and people feel they don’t have any voice, that they are imposed [upon].”

A representative from the corporation requested the trees’ removal to “enhance the amenity of the residential complex”.

Due to residents’ concerns the corporation has agreed to temporarily cease work on the removal of trees to determine if there are active species of fauna in the trees marked for removal.

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Fix for road is stuck in the slow lane

Not happy: Rooty Hill resident Kim Brazell is one of many motorists frustrated with the congestion on Francis Road: ‘‘We pay our taxes but we’re not seeing the results on our roads.’’ Picture: Natalie RobertsCALLS to widen a two-lane bridge across the railway line at Rooty Hill are getting louder but continue to fall on deaf years.
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The Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) has reiterated it has no plans to widen the Francis Road bridge, despite being a peak hour traffic nightmare.

It was built with bridge supports to expand it to four lanes.

When the Star first reported on the congestion in March, the RMS said it had not received any complaints in the past 12 months, despite Blacktown Council claiming otherwise.

Roads minister Duncan Gay has received at least two letters in the past month: one from state Mount Druitt MP Richard Amery on behalf of resident Kim Brazell and one from another resident, Bob Irwin.

In his reply to Mr Amery, Mr Gay said the RMS had no plans to widen the bridge but would investigate Francis Road and Railway and Duke streets as part of the government’s $125 million Pinch Point program, which targets peak hour hot spots to relieve congestion through measures such as replacing roundabouts with traffic lights.

Mr Irwin was sent a similar response.

It can take Mrs Brazell up to 10 minutes to get from one side of the railway line to the other in peak afternoon traffic.

‘‘It’s getting worse and worse because more people are moving out here,’’ she said.

‘‘I understand widening the bridge will cost a lot of money and put people out for 12 months but everyone will be happier in the long run.’’

In response in recent questions raised in parliament, Mr Amery was told there was a 3.7 per cent increase in traffic volumes near the Francis Road bridge between 2010 and 2013.

Travel times from the intersection of Rooty Hill Road South and Francis Street to Duke Street increased by two seconds to three minutes and 53 seconds in the morning peak and by 21 seconds to just over five minutes in the afternoon peak.

Go to stmarysstar南京夜网.au to have your say.

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