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Nashos long to list locals

The call has gone out for locals who enlisted for National Service between 1950 and 1959 in and around Griffith to add their names to a list. Thecall has gone out for locals who enlisted for National Service between 1950 and 1959 in and around Griffith to add their names to a list.
Nanjing Night Net

Griffith National Service branch member Jim McGann said the project, started by the late Vic Budd, hoped to create a historical record to be kept at the Griffith War Memorial Museum.

The current list of names, which contains about 250, is at the Griffith City Library and locals are being invited to check its accuracy and add their names to it.

“This is something we want to do inVic’s memory. Registration for National Service started mid-November 1950 until the end of December 1959,” Mr McGann said.

“I was one of the ones who went to afortnightly camp in about 1953 because the Korean war was about to finish.

“In that period of time, up to 1959, we were put on the short list to go to conflict in Malaya.

“It subsided and they didn’t need us.”

Mr McGann said he wanted to complete the list, but had found it difficult due to privacy laws.

“We are putting together this list and don’t want to miss anyone,” he said.

“Our intention is to give the list to the museum.

“This is about making sure all of our history is recorded.

“When I went to find out who was on the register in Griffith I was refused because of the privacy laws.

“It means everyone has to come to us.”

The list can be found at the front counter of the library and anyone with any relevant details is urged to contribute.

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Young gunns at heart volunteer

Bob and Lorraine Gunn moved to the Axedale region 50 years ago and have loved it ever since.
Nanjing Night Net

They helped build the community from the bottom up.

The couple made themoveto begin the regions first caravan park on the banks of Lake Eppalock.

Mrs Gunn said she volunteered in many areas of her community.

She said she struggled to remember each of them.

Mrs Gunn writes for thenews publication, Axedale Antics.

She said she contributed articles to each edition.

“We also publish a brief history of the Axedale region,” she said.

“We do a list of current events and activities in the area, as well.”

Mrs Gunn said she was also involved in the local Country Womens Association.

Mr Gunn said he was also involved in the development of the community area.

“We were both founding members of the Axedale golf club and Bob helped design the course,” Mrs Gunn said.

Mr Gunn received the citizen of the year award two years ago.

He was also a fire captain for 16 years in Mosquito Creek.

Mrs Gunn said volunteering was just part of their “everyday life”.

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‘Pinup’ contest brings back happy days

Self-growth: Nathan Robinson: “This is the first year the competition has had a brother and sister duo,” he said. Picture: Gary Warrick
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SHALVEY resident Nathan Robinson said his self-esteem and confidence was at the lowest it had ever been.

He was going through a divorce; he had lost his home; and he had recently moved back home to Canberra from Western Australia.

Then he entered the Mr Pinup category in the Miss Pinup Australia competition.

The competition focuses on the return of old-fashioned values and vintage fashion — and life started to look promising again for the 28-year-old.

“I’m on top of the world,” he said.

“I met my new girlfriend Miss Wurple Violet through the competition, and then I relocated to Shalvey to be with her and her three kids. It’s been a whirlwind of positives.”

Robinson, who goes by the pin-up name Harley Quinn, won the Mr Pinup NSW category at the state finals on June 29 at Blacktown Workers Club.

The contestant, who draws inspiration from the TV show Happy Days, said the competition was more than a beauty pageant — it was a journey of self-growth.

“We haven’t seen it as a competition and I have made some really good friends,” he said.

“I have been growing personally throughout the whole experience.

“Now wearing vintage — I wear a lot more colour and I have even come out of my shell.”

Robinson said he and his fellow male competitor, Gentleman Jack De Wilde, have become “real good” friends.

“It’s not about beating him,” he said.

“It’s about supporting each other which we have done by talking, bouncing ideas of each other and overall encouraging each other.”

Robinson will see his sister, Miss Annie Key, who is also competing in the national competition on August 2, at Hornsby RSL.

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When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part IIPhotos

When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part II | Photos THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.
Nanjing Night Net

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

TweetFacebookCentral Western Dailyhas scoured it’s archived editions to present to you this look back in time.

Way back in time.

‘When we ruled this city’ galleries have become a staple ofthecentralwesterndaily南京夜网.audiet, with a new one published each Tuesday.

We continue with a look at July, 1993.

Weddings, anniversaries, engagements, 21sts, 18ths and any other event that caught our eye has been included.

This is the second of four chapter which will explore the social goings on in July, 1993.

So sit back and take a walk down memory lane … and try not to choke on your cuppa as you take in the fashions and hairstyles!

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Second big scalp for Halls Head in Peel Football League

Second big scalp for Halls Head in Peel Football League Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.
Nanjing Night Net

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

Rockingham were too strong for Mandurah.

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Calls to help sex-change kids as demand for gender reassignment soars

An increasing number of children identifying as transgender. The number ofchildren accessing medical treatment to help them change gender has increased 60-fold, leaving Australia’s only clinic for transgender young people struggling to cope with the rise in demand.
Nanjing Night Net

Exclusive figures obtained byThe Sunday Ageshow the Royal Children’s Hospital gender dysphoria service is seeing 150 patients a year, with new referrals rising from one per year in 2003 to 60 in 2014.

Gender pioneers wage war with law and officialdom

Parents of children as young as three with gender dysphoria – which causes persistent and distressing feelings of being born the wrong sex – are facing a five-month wait for treatment.

Doctors say the surge in demand is being seen throughout the Western world as increased awareness of transgender issues prompts more people to seek help to transition to the gender with which they identify.

But doctors fear services are not keeping up, and warn that delayed treatment puts patients at high risk of self-harm.

“For young people who aren’t supported in expressing and having treatment for their gender dysphoria, approximately 30 per cent will attempt suicide and the evidence is that they are at greatest risk in the time between deciding they want to pursue treatment and actually being able to access that treatment,” said Michelle Telfer, clinical leader at the Royal Children’s Hospital’s Centre for Adolescent Health, and head of the gender dysphoria service.

While gender non-conformity in itself is not a mental disorder, for those who experience distress around gender identity, treatment is critical.

“We see kids in early primary school who might be biologically female but have never worn a dress to school and have always worn typically male clothing and have been known as a boy throughout their schooling so to suddenly go through puberty and develop breasts, it’s an emergency for that person to receive treatment.”

Dr Telfer said further barriers are arising due to a “cruel and unnecessary” legal process that is forcing desperate parents to spend $20,000 or more in court costs to access medical intervention.

While the hospital can provide puberty-suppressing drugs without a court order – usually from the age of 11 onwards providing there is parental consent – Australia is one of the few jurisdictions in the world that requires court approval for stage two hormone treatment to help patients develop the characteristics of their affirmed gender. Long-term use of puberty-blockers can cause osteoporosis, meaning patients usually stop taking them at 16. But without access to hormone therapy they will revert back to their birth gender, causing significant distress.

The Family Court relies solely on the evidence of the hospital’s medical team yet still forces parents to go to court for hormone approval, which has been granted in 100 per cent of cases.

Melbourne mother-of-three Therese* toldThe Sunday Ageshe spent her life savings on legal fees to help 17-year-old son Sam, who was born female, gain access to hormones after he was diagnosed with gender dysphoria.

“He was a really unhappy child. He was angry, and he couldn’t deal with the changes happening to his body. I’m a single mum and I’m in debt now but I just don’t want to think about what would have happened if I didn’t do it. It’s important that he feels comfortable in the body he’s in so it’s really unfair that you have to go through the legal system to make that happen.’’

Sam*, who said he has felt like a boy since he was a young child, started hormone injections last month and said it was a relief to finally get the treatment.

“If I wasn’t certain I would have waited until I was 18 when I wouldn’t need a court order, but I was so certain this was the right thing to do. It’s distressing to see your peers grow to six feet and start getting facial hair and basically growing up and you’re not, and you’re in a body you’re really not comfortable with.”

In a landmark case in August last year, the Family Court ruled that legal intervention was no longer required for puberty-suppressing drugs after the parents of “Jamie” challenged the need for court permission for their son, who was born female, to receive treatment.

The ruling stated that the therapy was reversible and, provided there was parental consent and approval from the child’s medical team, court authority was not required. However, it ruled stage two treatment, which is only partially reversible, still required a court order.

Dr Telfer said the situation was absurd. “With really young children who show gender-identity concerns, approximately only 20 per cent will persist with those concerns into puberty – that’s why we don’t start medical intervention until the child is older. Once you hit puberty, if you identify as being transgender then 99.5 per cent of those people will continue to feel that way throughout adulthood,” she said. “The time that doctors are required to produce evidence for the court with the growing number of patients means we are going to need a huge amount of resources to keep up with demand.”

The hospital is lobbying the state government to increase funding for the clinic and change legislation that requires court orders for hormone treatment, andThe Sunday Agebelieves a ministerial advisory group on transgender issues has recommended both measures.

Story courtesy ofhttp://www.smh南京夜网.au/national/calls-to-help-sexchange-kids-as-demand-for-gender-reassignment-soars-20140704-zsvz7.html

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Bogan mobile childcare service boosted by $130,000 federal grant

Parkes MP Mark Coulton. File photo.
Nanjing Night Net

A mobile childcare service that supports 13 isolated communities from its Nyngan base has received $130,000 in federal funding.

The boost for the Bogan Bush Mobile Resource Unit is part of more than $2 million to flow into the Parkes electorate from a program supporting providers in regional, remote, rural, disadvantaged and indigenous areas.

Parkes MP Mark Coulton recently announced the Budget Based Funded Programme grants to a total of seven mobile services, which received his praise for their support of communities with no viable permanent option.

Mr Coulton said the funding grants were designed to help mobile services with the cost of upgrading their vehicle, training staff and buying new educational equipment including books, DVDs, toys and other resources.

The Bogan Bush Mobile Resource Unit, which received the maximum grant of $130,000, assists the communities of Marthaguy, Quambone, Nyngan, Trangie, Mullengudgery, Collie, Tottenham, Collerina, the Marra, Hermidale, Girilambone, Warren and Mungery.

The Lachlan Mobile Child Care Service and the Paroo Contact Children’s Mobile also received the maximum grant.

Bourke and District Children’s Service, Brewarrina Mobile Resource Van, Goonimoo Mobile Resource Van and Tharawonga Mobile Resource Unit received $30,000 each.

“The Abbott government is committed to ensuring Australian families have access to affordable, flexible, high-qualitychildcareno matter where they live,”Mr Coultonsaid.

“Thesemobileservicesdo a fantastic job supporting regional and remote communities where access to permanentchildcareservices, let alone places, is not always available.

“They provide the Parkes electorate with a broad range ofservicessuch as playgroups, vacationcare, on-farmcare, parenting support and toy and DVD-lending libraries.

“Having a reliable and safe vehicle will allow theseservicesto focus their time, money and energy on high-quality education andcare.

“This funding will also helpserviceswith the cost of training their staff to deal with the unique challenges that come with delivering high-qualitychildcareon the road.”

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Caravan park fire, Neighbour suspects arson: VIDEO

NEIGHBOURS believe arson was responsible for the fire which destroyed two homes at a West Haven caravan park on Saturday night.
Nanjing Night Net

The residences, at the south east corner of the Christmas Cove Caravan and Lifestyle Park, started to burn about 6.03pm.

VIDEO FOOTAGE: A neighbour’s eyewitness account (click on the link below)

Neighbour’s eyewitness accountPHOTO GALLERY

WHEN THE STORY BROKE

Neighbour Ron Thatcher heard a loud smash followed by an explosion, and immediately went to investigate.

The army veteran said almost immediately the caravan closest to Ocean Drive was engulfed in flames.

“My hunch is that it was two Molotov cocktails, merely by the boom followed by an oomph noise as it exploded,” Mr Thatcher said.

What a mess: Firefighters mop up at the scene on Saturday night. Pic: MATT McLENNAN

The first van to burn was empty as its residents left the previous day at the request of management.

“There was no one living there, and nothing in there that could burn like gas or a stove or oil, so it must have been a deliberate act,” Mr Thatcher said.

“Some of the guys standing out there in the cold with me last night mentioned that was their theory too, and that was before I’d said a word about it.

“We’re all of a similar mind on that.”

The woman living in the second caravan heard the noise, saw flames outside and fled just in time.

Most of the caravan park’s residents were evacuated by police from 6.15pm, while the complex’s power supply was shut down.

The area outside the management’s office was filled with people of all ages until about 9pm when they were permitted to return to their homes.

“There were lots of small kids,” Mr Thatcher said.

“There’s a couple whose grandchildren were running around with their blankets pretending to be Batman, oblivious to everything.

“They were having fun, but the rest of us were freezing.

“One guy came wearing thongs and shorts. He was suffering by the end of the night.”

Mr Thatcher grabbed a nearby fire hose to protect the home of his 86-year-old neighbour – a man who buried his wife on Friday – which flanked the side of the fire.

“I just knew that he couldn’t lose his house too,” Mr Thatcher.

“One of the gas bottles further up started to go and it sounded like a jumbo jet.

“I thought it was going to blow up like a hand grenade.”

The Laurieton Fire Brigade, led by Captain Les King, arrived shortly after and secured the area.

Detectives and forensic specialists established a crime scene on Saturday night.

Police were unable to comment on the suspected arson, and said the investigation is continuing.

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Gallery: Kangaroo Island Sport 5/07/14

Order photos here
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Gallery: Kangaroo Island Sport 5/07/14 Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Jim Hayden (DU) and Bailey Downing (WD) in Senior ColtsPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Minka Macauley (DU) makes a clean catch watched by Jada Cobby (WD)Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Willow Maunsell (WD) passes cleanly watched by Felicity Geisler (DU) in 11&UPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Mia Helyar (DU) looks down the court before passing in 13&U Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Hayley Geisler (DU) in 13&UPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Eloise Robinson (DU) intercepts a high pass to her opponent Bridget Benney WD, watched by Lauren Downing (WD) and Liberty Touhy (DU)Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Liberty Tuohy and Mia Helyar (DU) arms up to defend the pass from Lauren Downing (WD)in 15&U Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Defender Liberty Tuohy (DU) works hard in defence on Lauren Downing (WD) in 15&UPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Mia Helyar (DU) arms spread wide waiting for the pass Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Grace Sheridan (WD) works hard in defence in front of Mia Helyar, (DU) and Bridget Benney (WD) and Tayla Willson (DU) Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

15&U: Lauren Downing (WD) and Liberty Tuohy (DU)Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Brodie Howard (DU) contesting the throw up with Tim Buck (WD) watched by Clayton Willson (DU)Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Lawrence Larcombe. WD, Josh Graham WD, Clayton Willson DU just kicked the ball watched by Elijah Wiese DUPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Adam Buick (DU) shielded off by Andrew Fogden (WD) and Nick Tracker (DU)Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Jack Halloran Lawrence Larcombe Rhys Luciani (WD), Brodie Howard (DU), Elijah Wiese, Clayton Linke (DU), Nick Tracker and Leroy Turner (DU)in A gradePhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Lawrence Larcombe WD and Elijah Wiese DU Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Tim Earl WD and Nick Tracker DUPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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A Grade Goalie Verity Carey (WD) catches cleanly in the A Grade game in front of (DU) Defence Stacey DeZen watched by Emma Boyle WD and Eloise Wheaton DU Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Charlotte Gilfillan DU uses her height to advantage in the goal circle watches by Carmen Joseph WD Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Jess Lovering (WD) leaps high attempting to incept a shot for goal by Charlotte Gilfillan (DU) in A Grade, Kelly Fogden (WD) watches the actionPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

Dylan Bunney kicking, Josh Pameter, Joseph McGeePhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Kali Furniss (W) waits for the pass from team mate Lorri Whyte in B Grade Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Nikki Jones W passes off in front of DU Tash Willson Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Bridget Benney (WD) executes a high pass in C Grade, Talisha McArdle (WD) and Tamara Markopolous (W) Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Bridget Benney WD Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Tall WD goal shooter Sarah Were catches cleanly in front of Wisanger defences Michaela Williams and Abby Ripley-Dennis Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Patti Blucher WD attempts to intercept the pass to gaoler Skye Baker WPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Rachel Thomas (DU) and Elsa Jones (WD) fight for possession of the ball watched by Sarah Weatherspoon (WD) Kristy Pameter, and umpire, Carmen Joseph in D GradePhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Oscar Morgan goals successfully for Western Districts in Junior ColtsPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Jayden Geisler (DU) in pursuit of the ball with Tate Florance (WD) attempting to gain possessionPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

Jayden Geisler (DU) and Tate Florance (WD) in Junior ColtsPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

Jayden Geisler (DU) and Tate Florance (WD) in Junior ColtsPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Riley Boyle WD makes a well timed kick Photo: Maggie’s Photography

Toby Wheaton DU kicking,Robert Rodger Benney WD running on Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Grace Morgan Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Damian Willmott WD, Matt Kenchington DU having a small difference of opinionPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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“Where’s my free?”: Nathan Benson (DU), Ben Liddle, Donavan Whale (WD) Grant Byrne (DU) and Jared Mc Ardle (WD) in the reservesPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

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Declan Howard DU and Daniel Cane WD in a close encounter for the ballPhoto: Maggie’s Photography

Jack Gurney (DU) and Ben Liddle (WD)Photo: Maggie’s Photography

B Grade: Donavon Whale and Jack Correll (WD)Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Harley Tuohy (WD jumper) and Jake Coppins-Dankiewicz (DU), with Hassan Kinghorne (DU) watching Photo: Maggie’s Photography

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Rise and shine, RiverinaWednesday, July 23

Rise and shine, Riverina | Wednesday, July 23 TweetFacebook7.10am:Wow.
Nanjing Night Net

Policehave seized 21 suspected stolen sheep from an Old Junee propertyas they expanda major livestock theft investigation sparked by the stealing of 170 lambs worth a total of $28,560.

A search warrant was executed on the property early Tuesdaymorning.Read all about it here.

7am: Good morning, Riverina. July 23 has been declared Batman Day in celebration of his 75th birthday this year. The Daily Advertiser is paying tribute to the Caped Crusader today.

Is something happening in your neck of the woods? Let us know by emailing Nicole on [email protected]南京夜网.auor tweeting @FairfaxRiverina.

The Riverinaforecast from the Bureau of Meteorology:Partly cloudy. Areas of morning frost. The chance of light rain in the north tonight. Light winds. Daytime maximum temperatures between 13 and 18.

The South West Slopesforecastfrom the Bureau of Meteorology:Partly cloudy. Patchy fog early this morning. Areas of morning frost. Light winds. Daytime maximum temperatures between 10 and 14.

Check your weather here: Wagga – Griffith – Leeton – Junee – Henty – Coleambally

Bert Newton (1938), Philip Seymour Hoffman (1967-2014), Charisma Carpenter (1970), Alison Krauss (1971), Monica Lewinsky (1973), Paul Wesley (1982) and Bec Hewitt (1983).

1903– TheFord Motor Companysells its first car.

1926–Fox Filmbuys the patents of theMovietone sound systemfor recording sound ontofilm.

1943– TheRayleigh bath chair murderoccurred inRayleigh,Essex, England.

1968 – The only successful hijacking of anEl Alaircraft takes place when aBoeing 707carrying 10 crew and 38 passengers istaken overby three members of thePopular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. The aircraft was en route fromRome, Italy, toLod, Israel.

1. What is the full name of Batman’s butler?

2. Batman first appeared in DC Comics’ Detective Comics #27 in May, 1939 as”theBat-Man”. What year did the character receive it’s own comic book title?

3. What is the name of Bruce Wayne’s parents?

4. What is Batman’s sidekick Robin’s real name?

5. What college did Bruce Wayne graduate from?

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

NAIDOC celebrations kick offPhotos

NAIDOC celebrations kick off | Photos The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.
Nanjing Night Net

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

The 10th anniversary of NAIDOC week in the Shoalhaven began on Monday, July 7.

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CFMEU lawyers call for police investigation into leaks ahead of Royal Commission

Lawyers for Australia’s biggest construction union have applied for a federal police investigation into a series of leaks of damning evidence to be heard at the royal commission into union corruption.
Nanjing Night Net

John Agius, SC, representing the Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union, has told the first sitting of the commission in Melbourne on Monday that it should be a “matter of grave concern” that leaks of untested accusations to the press, including Fairfax Media, have trashed the reputation of union officials.

The CFMEU was denied the opportunity to challenge the allegations of witnesses, Mr Agius said.

Royal Commissioner Dyson Heydon refused a CFMEU request that he order a federal police investigation into allegations the inquiry into union corruption was leaking information to the media.

Mr Heydon referred to a Fairfax Media article of June 3 and said there was “no support whatsoever” to the union’s claims that royal commission officers or witnesses were the sources.

The union could refer the matter to the federal police itself, Mr Heydon said.

Mr Agius said the hearing was not adhering to the practice adopted by the Cole Royal Commission of providing parties with statements of evidence prior to witnesses taking the stand.

The Royal Commission is examining the practices of superannuation giant Cbus, after revelations the fund was involved in large-scale leaking of workers’ personal details to the CFMEU.

The media reports centred on allegations by Peter Chiavaroli, a builder and developer at the old Pentridge prison site in Coburg, about intimidation, threats and corrupt demands by senior union officials.

The Pentridge site was largely non-union until a worker was killed in October 2009. After the death, the CFMEU mounted a fierce campaign to unionise and control the worksite, claiming it had been issued a ”record” amount of safety notices by Worksafe.

Another report outlined claims that a Labor Party official demanded $50,0000 to protect the Pentridge Prison re-development from CFMEU industrial action.

“It does appear that there has been no adequate explanation as to how the press would have this information,” Mr Agius said.

“How could it be understood by the press other than if the information had come from somebody with connections to, if not somebody working in, the royal commission.

“We seek to have that matter investigated.”

Mr Agius said it was a matter of public interest for the leaks to be investigated to ensure that whistleblowers would not be detered from giving evidence.

“It’s a matter that seriously effects the commission in the long term,” Mr Agius said.

The union at the centre of the claims has condemned the Royal Commission as a political “distraction” from the Abbott government’s unpopular budget.

“I think even blind Freddy knows this is all about politics,” said Dave Noonan, secretary of the CFMEU’s construction division.

“The Abbott government set this up in order to deflect attention from their budget. They knew they were going to have a horror budget, they knew they would need a distraction.

Mr Noonan said the CFMEU was proud of its role in recouping millions of dollars of superannuation entitlements a year.

“Tens of millions of dollars are ripped off from workers every year by employers who don’t pay or underpay superannuation entitlements in the construction industry.

“Our union takes this very seriously … we don’t make an apology for it; in fact, we are very proud of it.”

Mr Noonan said Cbus had a “very clear” policy around the provision of limited information for unions seeking to recover money owed to workers.

“The fact is that the regulators in this space – the Australian Tax Office and Fair Work Building and Construction – are asleep at the wheel. If they were doing their job there would be a lot less money for the union to go around and recover.”

Office of the Royal Commission chief executive Jane Fitzgerald strongly rejected the suggestion that anyone at the commission had briefed journalists on operational matters.

“Any suggestion to the contrary is false,” she said.

“The Office of the Royal Commission does not provide commentary or opinion in response to media enquiries. It provides factual information about hearings, procedure, evidence and witnesses before the commission.”

Counsel assisting the commission, Jeremy Stoljar, said the CFMEU’s submission for a police probe was an attempt to derail Monday’s hearings.

The commissioner said he would look at the issue in due course.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Man stabbed outside Myer cosmetics department in Westfield Parramatta

Parts of Westfield shopping centre closed after a fatal stabbing at Myer. Photo: Emma Partridge Parts of Westfield shopping centre were closed after a fatal stabbing outside Myer. Photo: Emma Partridge
Nanjing Night Net

Myer at Westfield Parramatta is closed after a man was stabbed to death nearby. Photo: Emma Partridge

Police at the crime scene at Parramatta Westfield. Photo: Brendan Esposito

Police at the crime scene in Westfield Parramatta. Photo: Brendan Esposito

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A man has been stabbed to death in a frenzied attack in front of shoppers at the Westfield shopping centre at Parramatta in Sydney’s west.

Emergency crews were called to the cosmetics section in the Myer store at 10.30am on Monday following reports of an attack.

Police said a 33-year-old man was stabbed multiple times by a man he knew just outside the department store in front of workers and children on school holidays in what they police may have been a “domestic related” dispute between the pair.

Parramatta police’s acting Superintendent Jenny Scholz said the stabbing was not gang related and that it was an isolated incident between the two men.

“This was a targeted attack and Westfield’s security and police responded immediately,” she told media at a press conference on Monday afternoon.

“I understand here was a connection between the gentleman. We are trying to establish whether it was domestic related.”

Police arrested a 33-year-old outside the Aquila Shoes store shortly after the stabbing.

It is understood the man, who has yet to be charged, ripped off his shirt and lit a cigarette before officers turned up to take him into custody.

Shopping centre employees said they heard two women screaming: “He’s killing him! He’s killing him!”

Myer employee Bianca Zoratto-Ivanov said a friend of hers saw the stabbing close to the cosmetics section at the entrance of the store.

“He heard a scream, like a man yell,” she said. “He heard it again and then he heard two young women scream: ‘He’s killing him! He’s killing him!’

“That’s when he turned around and saw the incident was taking place. He saw the man facing the store and doing the stabbing motions.”

Ms Zoratto-Ivanov said she knew the employee at Aquila Shoes who had seen the offender drive a machete into the victim.

“The man had a big machete,” she said.

“He saw glimpses of it, but turned around as soon as he saw.

“It wasn’t in Myer, it was outside of Myer.”

She said a number of women from the cosmetics section of Myer also saw the bloody stabbing and they were heard screaming.

Police have established a crime scene and investigations into the circumstances of the man’s death are in the early stages.

Witnesses say there is a large police presence, with parts of the centre closed.

A witness told Macquarie Radio that a man started stabbing another man. He then lit a cigarette, took his shirt off and waited for police to arrive.

The man, who had a large tattoo across his back, was arrested a short time later, the witness said.

UPDATE: Man in police custody following fatal stabbing in Myer at Westfield Parramatta. #9Newspic.twitter南京夜网/IYcRmcPFdq — Nine News Sydney (@9NewsSyd) July 7, 2014This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.