All Posts

Nashos long to list locals

The call has gone out for locals who enlisted for National Service between 1950 and 1959 in and around Griffith to add their names to a list. Thecall has gone out for locals who enlisted for National Service between 1950 and 1959 in and around Griffith to add their names to a list.
Nanjing Night Net

Griffith National Service branch member Jim McGann said the project, started by the late Vic Budd, hoped to create a historical record to be kept at the Griffith War Memorial Museum.

The current list of names, which contains about 250, is at the Griffith City Library and locals are being invited to check its accuracy and add their names to it.

“This is something we want to do inVic’s memory. Registration for National Service started mid-November 1950 until the end of December 1959,” Mr McGann said.

“I was one of the ones who went to afortnightly camp in about 1953 because the Korean war was about to finish.

“In that period of time, up to 1959, we were put on the short list to go to conflict in Malaya.

“It subsided and they didn’t need us.”

Mr McGann said he wanted to complete the list, but had found it difficult due to privacy laws.

“We are putting together this list and don’t want to miss anyone,” he said.

“Our intention is to give the list to the museum.

“This is about making sure all of our history is recorded.

“When I went to find out who was on the register in Griffith I was refused because of the privacy laws.

“It means everyone has to come to us.”

The list can be found at the front counter of the library and anyone with any relevant details is urged to contribute.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Young gunns at heart volunteer

Bob and Lorraine Gunn moved to the Axedale region 50 years ago and have loved it ever since.
Nanjing Night Net

They helped build the community from the bottom up.

The couple made themoveto begin the regions first caravan park on the banks of Lake Eppalock.

Mrs Gunn said she volunteered in many areas of her community.

She said she struggled to remember each of them.

Mrs Gunn writes for thenews publication, Axedale Antics.

She said she contributed articles to each edition.

“We also publish a brief history of the Axedale region,” she said.

“We do a list of current events and activities in the area, as well.”

Mrs Gunn said she was also involved in the local Country Womens Association.

Mr Gunn said he was also involved in the development of the community area.

“We were both founding members of the Axedale golf club and Bob helped design the course,” Mrs Gunn said.

Mr Gunn received the citizen of the year award two years ago.

He was also a fire captain for 16 years in Mosquito Creek.

Mrs Gunn said volunteering was just part of their “everyday life”.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

‘Pinup’ contest brings back happy days

Self-growth: Nathan Robinson: “This is the first year the competition has had a brother and sister duo,” he said. Picture: Gary Warrick
Nanjing Night Net

SHALVEY resident Nathan Robinson said his self-esteem and confidence was at the lowest it had ever been.

He was going through a divorce; he had lost his home; and he had recently moved back home to Canberra from Western Australia.

Then he entered the Mr Pinup category in the Miss Pinup Australia competition.

The competition focuses on the return of old-fashioned values and vintage fashion — and life started to look promising again for the 28-year-old.

“I’m on top of the world,” he said.

“I met my new girlfriend Miss Wurple Violet through the competition, and then I relocated to Shalvey to be with her and her three kids. It’s been a whirlwind of positives.”

Robinson, who goes by the pin-up name Harley Quinn, won the Mr Pinup NSW category at the state finals on June 29 at Blacktown Workers Club.

The contestant, who draws inspiration from the TV show Happy Days, said the competition was more than a beauty pageant — it was a journey of self-growth.

“We haven’t seen it as a competition and I have made some really good friends,” he said.

“I have been growing personally throughout the whole experience.

“Now wearing vintage — I wear a lot more colour and I have even come out of my shell.”

Robinson said he and his fellow male competitor, Gentleman Jack De Wilde, have become “real good” friends.

“It’s not about beating him,” he said.

“It’s about supporting each other which we have done by talking, bouncing ideas of each other and overall encouraging each other.”

Robinson will see his sister, Miss Annie Key, who is also competing in the national competition on August 2, at Hornsby RSL.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

GALLERY: Aberdeen Highland Games

CLANS, crowds and contests were the order of the day at the Aberdeen Highland Games last Saturday.
Nanjing Night Net

GALLERY: Aberdeen Highland Games IN SYNCH: The Scone RSL Pipes and Drums band members prepare to enter the grand parade at the Aberdeen Highland Games last Saturday.

READY TO MARCH: Shona McFarland with the Plains Pipes and Drums outfit from Gunnedah.

THE RIGHT NOTE: Tamworth’s pipe band enters the grand parade at Jefferson Park, Aberdeen.

VISITORS: Sydney Thistle joined the Aberdeen Highland Games celebrations at the weekend.

COLOURFUL: The Lithgow Highland Pipe Band made the trek to Aberdeen at the weekend.

MARCHING TO A DIFFERENT DRUM: The Hills District Pipe Band during Saturday’s grand parade.

THE GATHERING: Clan Farqharson Australia strides out at the 15th annual Aberdeen Highland Games.

MUSICAL HIT: The Armidale Pipe Band took part in the massed band salute last Saturday.

METICULOUS: The Royal Australian Navy at the 15th annual Aberdeen Highland Games.

LADY IN BLUE: Mary Hollingworth showed great interest in the grand parade at Jefferson Park.

FOLLOW ME: Drum Major Charles Cooke (second from left) leads the way during the massed band salute.

ALL RISE: A lone piper moved the crowd during the National Anthem at the Aberdeen Highland Games.

IMPRESSIVE: Some of the clans ready themselves for Saturday’s inspection.

AN HONOUR: Chieftain of the Day Greg MacLennan officially opens the 15th annual Aberdeen Highland Games.

RHYTHM’S GOING TO GET YOU: Three-year-old Lucy Turner, from Cobar, found her dancing shoes during the opening ceremony.

FANS YOUNG AND OLD: Matthew Whatman and daughter Layla enjoyed the proceedings on Saturday.

ON FIRE: Australia’s Federation Guard Precision Drill Team certainly captured the crowd’s interest at the weekend.

HIGHLY SKILFUL: Australia’s Federation Guard Precision Drill produced a perfect routine at Jefferson Park.

DIGNITARIES: From left, Upper Hunter Shire mayor Michael Johnsen, Upper Hunter MP George Souris, Aberdeen Highland Games president Barrie Lawn, Hunter MP Joel Fitzgibbon, Chieftain of the Day Greg MacLennan and Woody Udovenko.

PROUD MOMENT: Chieftain of the Day Greg MacLennan with wife Annelle and Woody Udovenko.

DRESSED FOR SUCCESS: Visitors Lillian Baber and Rachel Hattenfels soak up the atmosphere at the Aberdeen Highland Games.

SISTER ACT: Lithgow siblings Rachael and Melissa Besley at Jefferson Park, Aberdeen, last Saturday.

REGAL: Gunnedah’s Heather Welch and John Punch certainly looked the part at the weekend.

TARTAN TERRORS: City of Blacktown Pipe Band members Ewan and Bill Borthwick donned their kilts for the occasion.

ALL POWER: Muswellbrook’s Ben Hoffman (second from right) and his Maitland team mates who contested the Australian National Tug ‘o’ War Titles.

RUNNING FREE: Muswellbrook’s James Davison has his hands full with 15-month-old Clare and Hugh, two-and-a-half.

KING OF THE CLANS: Wallsend’s Luke Edwards strikes a pose at the Aberdeen Highland Games.

FULL OF PRAISE: Mark Lovett, of Moree, was impressed with the weekend activities.

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Rotary Club of Northam elects new officers

Group: RYE, Antoine, Anders and Hannah.THE Rotary Club of Northam has changed officers amid a glorious night of fellowship with some stand out moments.
Nanjing Night Net

District governor Angus Buchanan and wife Grace joined the club as awards were made to several people, recognising Rotarians past and present for their service to Rotary and the community.

The club farewelled Rotary exchange student Antoine Brunin who returned to France on Monday.

Meanwhile the club said hello to repat Anders Vindefelt-Bottke of Denmark (2010-11 Rotary youth exchange) who is back for a month’s holiday, and joined by 2012 outbound exchange, local girl Hannah Bowen.

Stalwart past-president Geoffrey Ruscoe, a member of the club for 36 years, was honoured with a Paul Harris Fellow sapphire, awarded honorary membership and given a plaque recognising his service.

Guests: District governor Angus Buchanana and his wife Grace.

Mr Ruscoe has submitted his resignation due to encroaching age and health issues.

He was then handed a printed memorial in print of the history of the Rotary North West Safari which was initiated by the club, in recognition of his 21 years steering the project, in the initial years with wife Kay.

Out-going: President -elect Jan Horsley and out-going president Velu Ramasamy.

Past club president (2006-7) Julian Krieg was named a Friend of Australian Rotary Health for steering Wheatbelt Men’s Health to where it is at today, from its 2001 start.

Having attained ongoing funding from the state government for four years, Mr Krieg last year retired from the position of chief executive of Wheatbelt Men’s’ Health.

Honour: Geoffrey Ruscoe displaying his sapphire award.

As membership director in 2007-8 he was responsible for introducing three men, in their 40s, one of whom is outgoing president Velu Ramasamy.

His year as president brought much joy and fellowship with ‘dress-up’ nights, a film night, the club celebrating its 60th anniversary of founding; and his dedication to improving the lot of disadvantaged as well as disabled in the community.

He was pinned with a Paul Harris Fellow by district governor Mr Buchanan.

Speech: District governor Angus Buchanan with past presidents Julian Krieg and Brian Webb.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Panthers basketballers victorious

In form: Sydney Kings NBL centre Angus Brandt in action for the Panthers against the Comets. Picture: Courtesy of Noel Rowsell, photoexcellence南京夜网.auTHE Penrith Panthers senior basketball teams had an impressive double-header success over the Sydney City Comets on Saturday night at the Alexandria Basketball Stadium.
Nanjing Night Net

In Round 14 of the 2014 Waratah Championship League (WCL) competition Sydney Flames WNBL stars Rohanee Cox (38 points) and Alicia Poto (26 points) were the catalysts for the eighth-placed Panthers thrilling 87-86 win in the opening game of the night.

That win will lift the Panthers into the top six, with the Bankstown Bruins and Panthers displacing the Newcastle Hunters and Comets respectively, thanks to a combination of results over the weekend.

Penrith then sprang a major surprise on the Comets in the men’s game, suiting up in his first game of the competition, newly-signed Sydney Kings NBL centre Angus Brandt made his mark with a personal haul of 24 points and 10 boards and inspired his lower Blue Mountains team-mate Jarrod Sorenson to a season-best game.

Sorenson finished with 16 points and 13 boards, Sean Albert had 17 points and Ben Kearins 15 points and 8 assists.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Serving Bendigo

Serving Bendigo PROGRESSIVE: John Rophael has an appointment with St John of God Bendigo Hospital. Picture: BRENDAN McCARTHY
Nanjing Night Net

EXCITED: John Rophael.

APPOINTMENT: John Rophael will do work at St John of God Hospital Bendigo.

TweetFacebookTHE Bendigo Advertiser is continuing topublisha series of profiles on healthcare specialists working in Bendigo.

The Central Victorian Medical Recruitment Taskforce worked diligently to create a sustainable medical workforce in central Victoria and the Bendigo Advertiser is helping to spread the word about the expertise available in Bendigo.

JOHN Rophael is a city boy with a passion for the country.

The vascular and endovascular surgeon studied at Melbourne University beforetraining as a junior doctorat St Vincent’s Hospital and rotating through a range of surgical specialties.

Mr Rophael decided to specialise in vascular surgery – medical treatment of diseases of the vascular system or arteries and veins – and split his training between Victoria and New South Wales.

“I trained at The Austin and The Alfred here in Victoria and at the Royal North Shore in Liverpool in Sydney,” he said.

“After I finished my training I decided to work regionally so I set up my practice in Wagga and also in Albury.

“I had quite a big practice there.

“I was essentially the sole surgeon coveringabout 400,000 people in the catchments and surrounding areas.

“It was good for a specialist who’d just finished to go and get that degree of exposure and also offer a regional service.”

Mr Rophael set up Albury’s first endovascular service and was also instrumental in establishing the first regional complex wound and ulcer multidisciplinary service.He also set up the region’s first endovenous laser treatment service.

“In Melbourne vascular surgery is very much city centric whereas in New South Wales I think they’ve tried the model of having vascularsurgeonsin regional areas like Lismore and Byron Bay,” Mr Rophael said.

“They proved it is possible, as long as you have a hospital that has the appropriate facilities.

“Wagga had already had some vascular surgery done there but the vascular surgeon who was there had left for a few years to go and set up in Tasmania.

“But in Albury there was very minimal vascular surgery, in fact no endovascular surgery was being done.So Iset that up and we treated quite a number of patients.”

Mr Rophael provides a range of vasculardiagnosticand interventional services including the management ofperipheral arterial disease; venous disease; complex ulcers and wounds; cerebrovascular disease; aortic and peripheral aneurysms; andspinal access surgery.

“Traditionally vascular surgery was done as open surgery,” Mr Rophael said.

“Now about 60 per cent of vascular surgery workload is endovascular which is minimally invasive, done through the vessel rather than exposing thevessels.So if you have a blocked artery, traditionally you’d open the artery and clear it out with open surgery.Now you put a little wire and you balloon it.

“Our patient population is often patients who are in their 70s and 80s and so on for whom a minimally invasive approach is always better because it carries a lesser risk ofanestheticcomplications, wound infection andthat sort of thing.”

Mr Rophael is based in Melbourne but has an appointment at St John of God Bendigo Hospital.

“I like workingregionally,” he said.

“The message I would like to convey is it is possible to do complex surgery for vascular surgery in a regional centre and I’m offering that here in Bendigo.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part IIIPhotos

When we ruled this city, July, 1993 – Part III | Photos THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.
Nanjing Night Net

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

THE WAY WE WERE: A selection of photos from the pages of the Central Western Daily from July, 1993.

If you run a business and you’re looking to advertise, our popular online photo galleries may be what you’re looking for.

TweetFacebookCentral Western Dailyhas scoured it’s archived editions to present to you this look back in time.

Way back in time.

‘When we ruled this city’ galleries have become a staple ofthecentralwesterndaily南京夜网.audiet, with a new one published each Tuesday.

We continue with a look at July, 1993.

Weddings, anniversaries, engagements, 21sts, 18ths and any other event that caught our eye has been included.

This is the third of four chapters which will explore the social goings on in July, 1993.

So sit back and take a walk down memory lane … and try not to choke on your cuppa as you take in the fashions and hairstyles!

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Snow White dwarfs the others: pantomime loads of fun

THE APPLE OF THE EYE: Magda Szubanski as the evil Queen GrismeldaMANY years ago, whilst living in the UK, I had the pleasure of performing in a pantomime.
Nanjing Night Net

Robin Hood and the Babes in the Wood featured all of the hallmarks of this classic theatrical format: a “dame” (a man in drag); cheesy pop songs; a spooky forest (he’s behind you); sweets being thrown to the audience; a moustache twirling villain; and audience participation (booing and hissing).

It was great fun and the audience lapped it up.

Unfortunately, pantomime is not a theatrical staple in Australia. We’re trained to sit in our seats and behave.

Luckily for Sydney audiences, this hasn’t stopped Bonnie Lythgoe (UK based producer and director, and former judge on So You Think You Can Dance Australia) from bringing Snow White Winter Family Musical to the State Theatre, just in time for the school holidays.

Pantomimes classically feature a celebrity cast hamming it up and Lythgoe has managed to snag one of the big guns of Australian stage and screen comedy in Magda Szubanski, as the dastardly Queen Grismelda.

Also starring are Jimmy Rees (TV’s Giggle and Hoot), Peter Everett (Ready Steady Cook), Andrew Cutcliffe (Underbelly: Razor) and US based Aussie musical theatre star Josh Adamson.

For the titular role, Lythgoe ran a country-wide talent search in a non-specific shopping centre chain and unearthed Erin Clare, a blue eyed brunette whose looks just scream Snow White.

Oh, she can sing and dance too.

Lythgoe has also somehow managed to convince Sir Cliff Richard (the ultimate real life Peter Pan) and radio shock jock Kyle Sandilands to prerecord their parts as the split personalities of the magic mirror.

Rounding out the cast are two troupes of way too talented kiddies who alternate performances as the dancing ensemble and then don some rather creepy heads to portray the seven dwarves.

I was accompanied by two friends who were reasonably unfamiliar with panto, but egged on by Rees’ court jester Muddles, it didn’t take long for them (and the whole audience) to adapt to the concept of audience participation.

We hissed the villain. We cheered for the handsome prince.

We groaned at the opening chords of the obligatory One Direction songs.

I booed at Kyle Sandilands (his onscreen cameo is further proof to my theory that he isn’t actually human).

The cast is uniformly fantastic with Rees particularly amusing (minus his owl) and Szubanski able to make a fluffed line into a memorable opportunity for hilarity.

Everett was appropriately camp and new discovery Erin Clare is as beautiful as she is talented (but should stay away from poisoned apples to avoid typecasting and endless slumber).

Despite a rather clunky script, some underwritten characters and a flat second act, I had a great time. Worth the entry price alone is the best onstage flying illusion I have every seen, and I’ve seen a lot. Forget Mary Poppins, this is the real thing.

Let’s hope Snow White Winter Family Musical is a hit so Lythgow can make her panto an annual highlight on the rather ho-hum Sydney theatrical calendar. Next time, I’m going to take the kids.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

“Best behaviour for ‘beautiful game’

Eye on the ball: St Marys player Riley Jamet gets a kick away against Lowland Wanderers on Saturday. Officials have been concerned about behaviour at Nepean football matches this season. Picture: Geoff JonesNEPEAN Football Association has conceded that there’s been too many unsavoury incidents at football matches this season, and has called on clubs to ensure that the environment at matches is better.
Nanjing Night Net

Nepean Football manager James Rankine sent a letter to all clubs asking to remember they’re involved in “the beautiful game”.

“We are receiving too many reports of bad behaviour, both on and off the field,” Rankine wrote.

“We have players being injured badly enough to lose jobs.

“We need to take ownership of this problem.”

Despite the problems, St Clair United Soccer Club president Mark Nelson said the situation wasn’t out of control.

“There’s been no more problems this year compared to previous years. There’s been incidences that shouldn’t have happened but it’s just a small minority ruining it for everyone else,” he said.

Nelson also didn’t think the incidents had anything to do with the controversial new referees association, controlled by Nepean.

“The new refs are a breath of fresh air,” he said.

St Marys Soccer Club president Joe Youssef has mixed feelings about the new Nepean Referees Group, which replaced the Nepean District Soccer Referees Association this season after a 50-year relationship with Nepean.

“The coverage is much better, but the standard isn’t,” Youssef said.

“From the feedback I get from my players and managers I’d give the new referees a 4/10 compared to last year’s who got about 7/10.

“One referee red-carded a player who hand-balled when the last line of defence, but wouldn’t send him off.”

But Youssef said it would be wrong to say the new group had failed considering it was just months old.

“I’m still happier this year because we’re getting more coverage, but I’m hoping they improve next year,” he said.

“I’m backing them subject to them improving and I’m confident they can.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Tall order

Chelsea D’Angelo and Nathan Catherwood will represent Victoria Country at the nationals. photograph samuel darrochBASKETBALL
Nanjing Night Net

TwoTraralgon T-Birds will take flight at the Australian Junior Championships this week in Geelong.

Nathan Catherwood and Chelsea D’Angelo were selected for their respective Victoria Country under 16 sides for the tournament, and are keen to impress on the national stage.

“(We’re) playing against really good competition, kids from all over Australia. I think it will be a real tough challenge against all the people, and the audience as well… there’ll be a lot of pressure, but I think I’ll get through it and it will help me out with my confidence and probably my game as well,” Nathan said.

Both have ambitions to join the Australian Institute of Sport, and someday play in the United States, with plans to showcase their talent at the championships.

“Hopefully there’ll be someone watching and I’ll get scouted or something,” Chelsea said.

“But I’m just hoping to improve my game and really enjoy it.”

The pair has been involved with the National Intensive Training Program this season, a development program which took Nathan to the US in 2012.

Chelsea had previously played with School Sport Victoria sides, while Nathan was a Victoria Country emergency last season.

Breaking through this season for their highest representative honours to date has been closely tied to the ‘practice makes perfect’ mantra.

“I think just what I’ve been practicing over and over again, just repetition, doing the same thing over and over again and I think that got me through; just playing the way I play,” Nathan said.

Chelsea too cited hard work, while a few extra inches in height and “a lot of intensity in my game and really trying hard”, did no harm to her credentials.

As “the shortest guy in the team”, point guard Nathan relied on ball handling, passing and “a bit of shooting” to break through a three-phase trial process, which involved competing at the Australian Junior Country Cup in January.

Chelsea’s patented one-on-one drives to the basket were on show through her selection camps, and the duo were both quietly confident of selection.

“There was a couple of really good kids that were there that certainly have a lot of skill, but I felt really comfortable with where I was at,” Nathan said.

“You just don’t know what the coaches are looking for though, you think ‘I’m doing really well but are they going to pick me?” Chelsea said.

Inspired by the example of Australian representative Jack White, who is also a Traralgon local, the T-Bird twosome are optimistic about their representative futures.

“He grew up in the same area so I could follow him and do the same things he’s done,” Nathan said.

The Australian Championships are on until Saturday.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Lunchtime fun to hit new levels: PHOTOS

Lunchtime fun to hit new levels: PHOTOS ESSCI volunteers (standing, from left) Geoff Swane, Mike McCrae, Ken Traise, John Mutch, Harry Weatherman, (sitting, from left) Mick Wood, John Bowles and Jim Chenhall donated their time to install fitness equipment surrounds at Eden Public School on Saturday.
Nanjing Night Net

ESSCI volunteers install fitness equipment surrounds at Eden Public School on Tuesday.

ESSCI volunteer Harry Weatherman lets his shovel do the talking as ESSCI install fitness equipment surrounds at Eden Public School on Saturday.

Mike McCrae sands back the equipment surrounds during the ESSCI working bee at Eden Public School on Saturday.

ESSCI volunteer Geoff Swane puts in a nail as the group installs fitness equipment surrounds at Eden Public School on Tuesday.

A jungle gym is among the fitness equipment being installed at Eden Public School.

Fitness equipment is being installed for students at Eden Public School.

The balance beam is sure to be a crowd favourite at Eden Public School

You’ll be hard pressed to find a student who doesn’t want a go on the monkey bars at Eden Public School.

Jim Chenhall hard at work during the ESSCI working bee at Eden Public School on Saturday.

Fitness equipment surrounds are installed at Eden Public School on Saturday.

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Shellharbour residents rally to keep library:Videos

Shellharbour resident Patricia Wickham gathered with other residents at the Shellharbour Village library on Friday last week to rally against any proposals to move it to Shell Cove. Picture: Eliza WinklerJackson Calverly. By Eliza Winkler
Nanjing Night Net

Jill Boothman. By Eliza Winkler

Paul Hockey. By Eliza Winkler

MORE than 30 residents joined together last Friday for the Save the Village Library Rally.

Councillor Kellie Marsh hosted the rally in response to Shellharbour City Council proposals to relocate the Shellharbour Village Library to Shell Cove.

A council spokesperson said there was a current strategy in place that explored the concept of moving the library to The Waterfront, Shell Cove development in 2018, however plans were only conceptual at this point and any changes would involve further community consultation.

Shellharbour resident Patricia Wickham said her main concern was accessibility and cost if the service was to be removed from the area.

“The library is used by a lot of the aged who live in the village, and most of them don’t drive,” Ms Wickham said.

“It worries me that we would have to rely on public transport.

‘‘It is an extra cost and also not easy using buses with walkers or other things some of us rely on to get around.

“It would be shame to see it go because it’s a real asset to this community and for the older people it is a way we can all keep our minds active.”

A council spokesperson said that if the library was to be relocated, current village library users would still have access to the service with expansions to the library’s home service.

The library is managed under a Libraries and Museums strategy 2024, which was adopted by council in March.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.